Infoseclabs Part III

At this point, we have the ESXi host built and VM’s running, but things are SLOOOOWWWW on that 7200RPM hard drive. So whats next? SSD’s of course!

I picked up a couple 240GB drives and went to work backing up my VM’s.

SSD
I went with two SanDisk Ultra II’s

 

I use Veeam for backups, which I’m a huge fan of.  I’ve been using Veeam for around 6 or 7 years, and it’s hands down the best backup software I’ve used.  Super easy to configure, and I can restore: entire VM’s, FLR (file-level recovery), and single email items inside Exchange mailboxes very quickly (Ok, Veeam commercial over).

veeam backup
Here’s an example of my Veeam backup job

So I backed up my VM’s and removed my old hard drive from the ESXi host.

I installed the SSD’s and began restoring my VM’s.  It was a little bit of  a process since I needed to install Veeam onto a different physical box to do the restores;  due to my backup server being located on a VM in the lab.  By the way, you should always put Veeam on a separate physical box 😛  In the end, it didn’t take very long at all though, and what a difference SSD’s make!!

I’ve added a few more VM’s into the lab as well:

 

lab 8-13-15
Lab restored!

But wait theres more!

 

I’ve also added some cool gear.  Many thanks to Hak5!

WiFi Pineapple Mark V Ultra Directional Kit:

20150730_144618

20150808_163108

20150808_163035

20150809_091842 (1)

IMG_0611

 

Lan Turtle:

20150807_174937

 

USB Rubber Ducky:

20150813_134448

20150813_134523

 

More to come soon, so stay tuned!!

  • How-to videos of exercises using the pineapple, rubber ducky, and lan turtle
  • Using PowerShell Empire with various Windows boxes, including Windows 10
  • A NAS upgrade/offsite replication configuration
  • A firewall upgrade from OpenWrt/Raspberry Pi to a Cisco ASA 5505
  • and much more!

Read More

Infoseclabs part II

Now that the server hardware is put together, I needed to set up and configure my firewall.

 

I found a great article Ben Miller wrote on installing OpenWRT onto a raspberry pi http://computers.tutsplus.com/articles/installing-openwrt-on-a-raspberry-pi-as-a-new-home-firewall–mac-55984, which worked wonderfully for me.

 

I configured my Raspberry Pi, which I named PiWall, to be a cascaded router on the AT&T modem/router.  I had purchased a block of 5 static IP’s as well for e-mail, web servers, sftp, etc.

 

Here I gave the PiWall a DHCP reservation on the modem
Here I gave the PiWall a DHCP reservation on the modem
This is where I added the reservation as a cascaded router
This is where I added the reservation as a cascaded router

I set up the PiWall for DHCP on the WAN interface and gave it 192.168.50.1 for the LAN.  I picked 192.168.50.0/24 for the IP scheme on the LAN interface.

 

Having picked my IP scheme I went on to set up the firewall with some basic rules, which included egress filtering.

Examples of some firewall rules on the PiWall
Examples of some firewall rules on the PiWall

 

It was now time to start setting up VMWare.  I made a bootable USB stick and started the installation.

Installing the Hypervisor
Installing the Hypervisor
Booting up
Booting up
Setting up domain controller, vcenter server, and Kali box
Time to start installing some VM’s! Here I’m setting up a domain controller, vcenter server, and Kali box
Added Windows 2008R2 file server, Exchange 2013, RHEL7 desktop and server, and an Ubuntu box.
Added Windows 2008R2 file server, Exchange 2013, RHEL7 desktop and server, and an Ubuntu box
Lab VM's so far
Lab VM’s so far
A very basic diagram of the network
A very basic diagram of the network

 

 

 

 

 

Read More